SRFI-135: Immutable Texts

This SRFI specifies a new data type of immutable texts. The operations of this new data type include analogues for all of the non-mutating operations on strings specified by the R7RS and most of those specified by SRFI 130, but the immutability of texts and uniformity of character-based indexing simplify the specification of those operations while avoiding several inefficiencies associated with the mutability of Scheme's strings.

This egg provides the UTF-8 version of the SRFI 135 sample implementation.

  1. SRFI-135: Immutable Texts
  2. Author
  3. SRFI Description
  4. Conceptual model
  5. Subtypes
  6. Notation
  7. Procedures
    1. Predicates
    2. Constructors
    3. Conversion
    4. Selection
    5. Replacement
    6. Comparison
    7. Prefixes & suffixes
    8. Searching
    9. Case conversion
    10. Concatenation
    11. Fold, map & friends
    12. Replication & splitting
  8. About This Egg
    1. Dependencies
    2. Maintainer
    3. Repository
    4. Version History
  9. License

Author

William D. Clinger

SRFI Description

This page includes excerpts from the SRFI document, but is primarily intended to document the forms exported by the egg. For a full description of this SRFI, see the full SRFI document.

The external representation of texts specified by SRFI 135 is not yet supported.

Conceptual model

Immutable texts are like strings except they can't be mutated.

Immutability makes it easier to use space-efficient representations such as UTF-8 and UTF-16 without incurring the cost of scanning from the beginning when character indexes are used (as with string-ref).

When mutation is not needed, immutable texts are likely to be more efficient than strings with respect to space or time. In some implementations, immutable texts may be more efficient than strings with respect to both space and time.

Subtypes

This SRFI defines two new types:

The subtypes of the new textual type include the new text type and Scheme's traditional string type, which consists of the values for which string? returns true. The string type includes both mutable strings and the (conceptually) immutable strings that are the values of string literals and calls to symbol->string.

Notation

In the following procedure specifications:

It is an error to pass values that violate the specification above.

Arguments given in square brackets are optional. Unless otherwise noted in the text describing the procedure, any prefix of these optional arguments may be supplied, from zero arguments to the full list. When a procedure returns multiple values, this is shown by listing the return values in square brackets, as well.

Procedures

Predicates

[procedure] (text? obj) → boolean

Is obj an immutable text? In particular, (text? obj) returns false if (string? obj) returns true, which implies string? returns false if text? returns true.

[procedure] (textual? obj) → boolean

Returns true if and only obj is an immutable text or a string.

[procedure] (textual-null? text) → boolean

Is text the empty text?

[procedure] (textual-every pred textual [start end]) → value
[procedure] (textual-any pred textual [start end]) → value

Checks to see if every/any character in textual satisfies pred, proceeding from left (index start) to right (index end). These procedures are short-circuiting: if pred returns false, textual-every does not call pred on subsequent characters; if pred returns true, textual-any does not call pred on subsequent characters; Both procedures are "witness-generating":

Note: The names of these procedures do not end with a question mark. This indicates a general value is returned instead of a simple boolean (#t or #f).

Constructors

[procedure] (make-text len char) → text

Returns a text of the given length filled with the given character.

[procedure] (text char ...) → text

Returns a text consisting of the given characters.

[procedure] (text-tabulate proc len) → text

proc is a procedure that accepts an exact integer as its argument and returns a character. Constructs a text of size len by calling proc on each value from 0 (inclusive) to len (exclusive) to produce the corresponding element of the text. The order in which proc is called on those indexes is not specified.

[procedure] (text-unfold stop? mapper successor seed [base make-final]) → text

This is a fundamental constructor for texts.

text-unfold is a fairly powerful text constructor. You can use it to convert a list to a text, read a port into a text, reverse a text, copy a text, and so forth. Examples:

(port->text p) = (text-unfold eof-object?
                              values
                              (lambda (x) (read-char p))
                              (read-char p))

(list->text lis) = (text-unfold null? car cdr lis)

(text-tabulate f size) = (text-unfold (lambda (i) (= i size)) f add1 0)

;; To map f over a list lis, producing a text:
(text-unfold null? (compose f car) cdr lis)
[procedure] (text-unfold-right stop? mapper successor seed [base make-final]) → text

This is a fundamental constructor for texts. It is the same as text-unfold except the results of mapper are assembled into the text in right-to-left order, base is the optional rightmost portion of the constructed text, and make-final produces the leftmost portion of the constructed text.

(text-unfold-right (lambda (n) (< n (char->integer #\A)))
                   (lambda (n) (char-downcase (integer->char n)))
                   (lambda (n) (- n 1))
                   (char->integer #\Z)
                   #\space
                   (lambda (n) " The English alphabet: "))
  ⇒ « The English alphabet: abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz »

Conversion

[procedure] (textual->text textual) → text

When given a text, textual->text just returns that text. When given a string, textual->text returns the result of calling string->text on that string. Signals an error when its argument is neither string nor text.

[procedure] (textual->string textual [start end]) → string
[procedure] (textual->vector textual [start end]) → char-vector
[procedure] (textual->list textual [start end]) → char-list

textual->string, textual->vector, and textual->list return a newly allocated (unless empty) mutable string, vector, or list of the characters that make up the given subtext or substring.

[procedure] (string->text string [start end]) → text
[procedure] (vector->text char-vector [start end]) → text
[procedure] (list->text char-list [start end]) → text

These procedures return a text containing the characters of the given substring, subvector, or sublist. The behavior of the text will not be affected by subsequent mutation of the given string, vector, or list.

[procedure] (reverse-list->text char-list) → text

An efficient implementation of (compose list->text reverse):

(reverse-list->text '(#\a #\B #\c)) → «cBa»

This is a common idiom in the epilogue of text-processing loops that accumulate their result using a list in reverse order. (See also textual-concatenate-reverse for the "chunked" variant.)

[procedure] (textual->utf8 textual [start end]) → bytevector
[procedure] (textual->utf16 textual [start end]) → bytevector
[procedure] (textual->utf16be textual [start end]) → bytevector
[procedure] (textual->utf16le textual [start end]) → bytevector

These procedures return a newly allocated (unless empty) bytevector containing a UTF-8 or UTF-16 encoding of the given subtext or substring.

The bytevectors returned by textual->utf8, textual->utf16be, and textual->utf16le do not contain a byte-order mark (BOM). textual->utf16be returns a big-endian encoding, while textual->utf16le returns a little-endian encoding.

The bytevectors returned by textual->utf16 begin with a BOM that declares an implementation-dependent endianness, and the bytevector elements following that BOM encode the given subtext or substring using that endianness.

[procedure] (utf8->text bytevector [start end]) → text
[procedure] (utf16->text bytevector [start end]) → text
[procedure] (utf16be->text bytevector [start end]) → text
[procedure] (utf16le->text bytevector [start end]) → text

These procedures interpret their bytevector argument as a UTF-8 or UTF-16 encoding of a sequence of characters, and return a text containing that sequence.

The bytevector subrange given to utf16->text may begin with a byte order mark (BOM); if so, that BOM determines whether the rest of the subrange is to be interpreted as big-endian or little-endian; in either case, the BOM will not become a character in the returned text. If the subrange does not begin with a BOM, it is decoded using the same implementation-dependent endianness used by textual->utf16.

The utf16be->text and utf16le->text procedures interpret their inputs as big-endian or little-endian, respectively. If a BOM is present, it is treated as a normal character and will become part of the result.

It is an error if the bytevector subrange given to utf8->text contains invalid UTF-8 byte sequences. For the other three procedures, it is an error if start or end are odd, or if the bytevector subrange contains invalid UTF-16 byte sequences.

Selection

[procedure] (text-length text) → len

Returns the number of characters within the given text.

[procedure] (text-ref text idx) → char

Returns character text[idx], using 0-origin indexing.

[procedure] (textual-length textual) → len
[procedure] (textual-ref textual idx) → char

textual-length returns the number of characters in textual, and textual-ref returns the character at character index idx, using 0-origin indexing. These procedures are the generalizations of text-length and text-ref to accept strings as well as texts. If textual is a text, they must execute in O(1) time, but there is no such requirement if textual is a string.

[procedure] (subtext text start end) → text
[procedure] (subtextual textual start end) → text

These procedures return a text containing the characters of text or textual beginning with index start (inclusive) and ending with index end (exclusive).

If textual is a string, then that string does not share any storage with the result, so subsequent mutation of that string will not affect the text returned by subtextual. When the first argument is a text, as is required by subtext, the implementation returns a result that shares storage with that text. These procedures just return their first argument when that argument is a text, start is 0, and end is the length of that text.

[procedure] (textual-copy textual [start end]) → text

Returns a text containing the characters of textual beginning with index start (inclusive) and ending with index end (exclusive).

Unlike subtext and subtextual, the result of textual-copy never shares substructures that would retain characters or sequences of characters that are substructures of its first argument or previously allocated objects.

If textual-copy returns an empty text, that empty text may be eq? or eqv? to the text returned by (text). If the text returned by textual-copy is non-empty, then it is not eqv? to any previously extant object.

[procedure] (textual-take textual nchars) → text
[procedure] (textual-drop textual nchars) → text
[procedure] (textual-take-right textual nchars) → text
[procedure] (textual-drop-right textual nchars) → text

textual-take returns a text containing the first nchars of textual; textual-drop returns a text containing all but the first nchars of textual. textual-take-right returns a text containing the last nchars of textual; textual-drop-right returns a text containing all but the last nchars of textual.

If textual is a string, then that string does not share any storage with the result, so subsequent mutation of that string will not affect the text returned by these procedures. If textual is a text, the result shares storage with that text.

(textual-take "Pete Szilagyi" 6) ⇒ «Pete S»
(textual-drop "Pete Szilagyi" 6) ⇒ «zilagyi»

(textual-take-right "Beta rules" 5) ⇒ «rules»
(textual-drop-right "Beta rules" 5) ⇒ «Beta »

;; It is an error to take or drop more characters than are
;; in the text:
(textual-take "foo" 37) ⇒ error
[procedure] (textual-pad textual len [char start end]) → text
[procedure] (textual-pad-right textual len [char start end]) → text

Returns a text of length len comprised of the characters drawn from the given subrange of textual, padded on the left (right) by as many occurrences of the character char as needed. If textual has more than len chars, it is truncated on the left (right) to length len. char defaults to #\space.

If textual is a string, then that string does not share any storage with the result, so subsequent mutation of that string will not affect the text returned by these procedures. If textual is a text, the result shares storage with that text whenever sharing would be space-efficient.

(textual-pad "325" 5) ⇒ «  325»
(textual-pad "71325" 5) ⇒ «71325»
(textual-pad "8871325" 5) ⇒ «71325»
[procedure] (textual-trim textual [pred start end]) → text
[procedure] (textual-trim-right textual [pred start end]) → text
[procedure] (textual-trim-both textual [pred start end]) → text

Returns a text obtained from the given subrange of textual by skipping over all characters on the left / on the right / on both sides that satisfy the second argument pred: pred defaults to char-whitespace?.

If textual is a string, then that string does not share any storage with the result, so subsequent mutation of that string will not affect the text returned by these procedures. If textual is a text, the result shares storage with that text whenever sharing would be space-efficient.

(textual-trim-both "  The outlook wasn't brilliant,  \n\r") ⇒ «The outlook wasn't brilliant,»

Replacement

[procedure] (textual-replace textual1 textual2 start1 end1 [start2 end2]) → text

Returns

(textual-append (subtextual textual1 0 start1)
(subtextual textual2 start2 end2)
(subtextual textual1 end1 (textual-length textual1)))

That is, the segment of characters in textual1 from start1 to end1 is replaced by the segment of characters in textual2 from start2 to end2. If start1 = end1, this simply splices the characters drawn from textual2 into textual1 at that position.

Examples:

(textual-replace "The TCL programmer endured daily ridicule."
                 "another miserable perl drone"
                 4
                 7
                 8
                 22)
⇒ «The miserable perl programmer endured daily ridicule.»

(textual-replace "It's easy to code it up in Scheme."
                 "lots of fun"
                 5
                 9)
⇒ «It's lots of fun to code it up in Scheme.»

(define (textual-insert s i t) (textual-replace s t i i))

(textual-insert "It's easy to code it up in Scheme." 5 "really ")
⇒ «It's really easy to code it up in Scheme.»

(define (textual-set s i c) (textual-replace s (text c) i (+ i 1)))

(textual-set "Text-ref runs in O(n) time." 19 #\1)
⇒ «Text-ref runs in O(1) time.»

Comparison

[procedure] (textual=? textual1 textual2 textual3 ...) → boolean

Returns #t if all the texts have the same length and contain exactly the same characters in the same positions; otherwise returns #f.

[procedure] (textual<? textual1 textual2 textual3 ...) → boolean
[procedure] (textual>? textual1 textual2 textual3 ...) → boolean
[procedure] (textual<=? textual1 textual2 textual3 ...) → boolean
[procedure] (textual>=? textual1 textual2 textual3 ...) → boolean

These procedures compare their arguments lexicographically and return #t if they are (respectively): monotonically increasing, monotonically decreasing, monotonically non-decreasing, or monotonically non-increasing.

These comparison predicates are transitive.

[procedure] (textual-ci=? textual1 textual2 textual3 ...) → boolean

Returns #t if, after calling textual-foldcase on each of the arguments, all of the case-folded texts would have the same length and contain the same characters in the same positions; otherwise returns #f.

[procedure] (textual-ci<? textual1 textual2 textual3 ...) → boolean
[procedure] (textual-ci>? textual1 textual2 textual3 ...) → boolean
[procedure] (textual-ci<=? textual1 textual2 textual3 ...) → boolean
[procedure] (textual-ci>=? textual1 textual2 textual3 ...) → boolean

These procedures behave as though they had called textual-foldcase on their arguments before applying the corresponding procedures without "-ci".

Prefixes & suffixes

[procedure] (textual-prefix-length textual1 textual2 [start1 end1 start2 end2]) → integer
[procedure] (textual-suffix-length textual1 textual2 [start1 end1 start2 end2]) → integer

Return the length of the longest common prefix/suffix of textual1 and textual2. For prefixes, this is equivalent to their "mismatch index" (relative to the start indexes).

The optional start/end indexes restrict the comparison to the indicated subtexts of textual1 and textual2.

[procedure] (textual-prefix? textual1 textual2 [start1 end1 start2 end2]) → boolean
[procedure] (textual-suffix? textual1 textual2 [start1 end1 start2 end2]) → boolean

Is textual1 a prefix/suffix of textual2?

The optional start/end indexes restrict the comparison to the indicated subtexts of textual1 and textual2.

Searching

[procedure] (textual-index textual pred [start end]) → idx-or-false
[procedure] (textual-index-right textual pred [start end]) → idx-or-false
[procedure] (textual-skip textual pred [start end]) → idx-or-false
[procedure] (textual-skip-right textual pred [start end]) → idx-or-false

textual-index searches through the given subtext or substring from the left, returning the index of the leftmost character satisfying the predicate pred. textual-index-right searches from the right, returning the index of the rightmost character satisfying the predicate pred. If no match is found, these procedures return #f.

The start and end arguments specify the beginning and end of the search; the valid indexes relevant to the search include start but exclude end. Beware of "fencepost" errors: when searching right-to-left, the first index considered is (- end 1), whereas when searching left-to-right, the first index considered is start. That is, the start/end indexes describe the same half-open interval [start,end) in these procedures that they do in all other procedures specified by this SRFI.

The skip functions are similar, but use the complement of the criterion: they search for the first char that doesn't satisfy pred. To skip over initial whitespace, for example, say

(subtextual text
            (or (textual-skip text char-whitespace?)
                (textual-length text))
            (textual-length text))

These functions can be trivially composed with textual-take and textual-drop to produce take-while, drop-while, span, and break procedures without loss of efficiency.

[procedure] (textual-contains textual1 textual2 [start1 end1 start2 end2]) → idx-or-false
[procedure] (textual-contains-right textual1 textual2 [start1 end1 start2 end2]) → idx-or-false

Does the subtext of textual1 specified by start1 and end1 contain the sequence of characters given by the subtext of textual2 specified by start2 and end2?

Returns #f if there is no match. If start2 = end2, textual-contains returns start1 but textual-contains-right returns end1. Otherwise returns the index in textual1 for the first character of the first/last match; that index lies within the half-open interval [start1,end1), and the match lies entirely within the [start1,end1) range of textual1.

;; Searches "a geek"
(textual-contains "eek -- what a geek." "ee" 12 18) ⇒ 15

Note: The names of these procedures do not end with a question mark. This indicates a useful value is returned when there is a match.

Case conversion

[procedure] (textual-upcase textual) → text
[procedure] (textual-downcase textual) → text
[procedure] (textual-foldcase textual) → text
[procedure] (textual-titlecase textual) → text

These procedures return the text obtained by applying Unicode's full uppercasing, lowercasing, case-folding, or title-casing algorithms to their argument. In some cases, the length of the result may be different from the length of the argument. Note that language-sensitive mappings and foldings are not used.

Concatenation

[procedure] (textual-append textual ...) → text

Returns a text whose sequence of characters is the concatenation of the sequences of characters in the given arguments.

[procedure] (textual-concatenate textual-list) → text

Concatenates the elements of textual-list together into a single text.

If any elements of textual-list are strings, then those strings do not share any storage with the result, so subsequent mutation of those string will not affect the text returned by this procedure. The result shares storage with the texts in the list if that sharing would be space-efficient.

[procedure] (textual-concatenate-reverse textual-list [final-textual end]) → text

With no optional arguments, calling this procedure is equivalent to

(textual-concatenate (reverse textual-list))

If the optional argument final-textual is specified, it is effectively consed onto the beginning of textual-list before performing the list-reverse and textual-concatenate operations.

If the optional argument end is given, only the characters up to but not including end in final-textual are added to the result, thus producing

(textual-concatenate
 (reverse (cons (subtext final-textual 0 end)
                textual-list)))

For example:

(textual-concatenate-reverse '(" must be" "Hello, I") " going.XXXX" 7)
 ⇒ «Hello, I must be going.»
[procedure] (textual-join textual-list [delimiter grammar]) → text

This procedure is a simple unparser; it pastes texts together using the delimiter text.

textual-list is a list of texts and/or strings. delimiter is a text or a string. The grammar argument is a symbol that determines how the delimiter is used, and defaults to 'infix. It is an error for grammar to be any symbol other than these four:

The delimiter is the text used to delimit elements; it defaults to a single space " ".

(textual-join '("foo" "bar" "baz")) ⇒ «foo bar baz»
(textual-join '("foo" "bar" "baz") "") ⇒ «foobarbaz»
(textual-join '("foo" "bar" "baz") «) ⇒ «foo:bar:baz»
(textual-join '("foo" "bar" "baz") ":" 'suffix) ⇒ «foo:bar:baz:»

;; Infix grammar is ambiguous wrt empty list vs. empty text:
(textual-join '()   ":") ⇒ «»
(textual-join '("") ":") ⇒ «»

;; Suffix and prefix grammars are not:
(textual-join '()   ":" 'suffix)) ⇒ «»
(textual-join '("") ":" 'suffix)) ⇒ «

Fold, map & friends

[procedure] (textual-fold kons knil textual [start end]) → value
[procedure] (textual-fold-right kons knil textual [start end]) → value

These are the fundamental iterators for texts.

The textual-fold procedure maps the kons procedure across the given text or string from left to right:

(... (kons textual[2] (kons textual[1] (kons textual[0] knil))))

In other words, textual-fold obeys the (tail) recursion

(textual-fold kons knil textual start end) = (textual-fold kons (kons textual[start] knil) start+1 end)

The textual-fold-right procedure maps kons across the given text or string from right to left:

(kons textual[0]
      (... (kons textual[end-3]
                 (kons textual[end-2]
                       (kons textual[end-1] knil)))))

obeying the (tail) recursion

(textual-fold-right kons knil textual start end) = (textual-fold-right kons (kons textual[end-1] knil) start end-1)

Examples:

;; Convert a text or string to a list of chars.
(textual-fold-right cons '() textual)

;; Count the number of lower-case characters in a text or string.
(textual-fold (lambda (c count)
                (if (char-lower-case? c) (+ count 1) count))
              0
              textual)

The textual-fold-right combinator is sometimes called a "catamorphism."

[procedure] (textual-map proc textual1 textual2 ...) → text

It is an error if proc does not accept as many arguments as the number of textual arguments passed to textual-map, does not accept characters as arguments, or returns a value that is not a character, string, or text.

The textual-map procedure applies proc element-wise to the characters of the textual arguments, converts each value returned by proc to a text, and returns the concatenation of those texts. If more than one textual argument is given and not all have the same length, then textual-map terminates when the shortest textual argument runs out. The dynamic order in which proc is called on the characters of the textual arguments is unspecified, as is the dynamic order in which the coercions are performed. If any strings returned by proc are mutated after they have been returned and before the call to textual-map has returned, then textual-map returns a text with unspecified contents; the textual-map procedure itself does not mutate those strings.

Example:

(textual-map (lambda (c0 c1 c2)
               (case c0
                 ((#\1) c1)
                 ((#\2) (string c2))
                 ((#\-) (text #\- c1))))
             (string->text "1222-1111-2222")
             (string->text "Hi There!")
             (string->text "Dear John"))
  ⇒ «Hear-here!»
[procedure] (textual-for-each proc textual1 textual2 ...) → unspecified

It is an error if proc does not accept as many arguments as the number of textual arguments passed to textual-for-each or does not accept characters as arguments.

The textual-for-each procedure applies proc element-wise to the characters of the textual arguments, going from left to right. If more than one textual argument is given and not all have the same length, then textual-for-each terminates when the shortest textual argument runs out.

[procedure] (textual-map-index proc textual [start end]) → text

Calls proc on each valid index of the specified subtext or substring, converts the results of those calls into texts, and returns the concatenation of those texts. It is an error for proc to return anything other than a character, string, or text. The dynamic order in which proc is called on the indexes is unspecified, as is the dynamic order in which the coercions are performed. If any strings returned by proc are mutated after they have been returned and before the call to textual-map-index has returned, then textual-map-index returns a text with unspecified contents; the textual-map-index procedure itself does not mutate those strings.

[procedure] (textual-for-each-index proc textual [start end]) → unspecified

Calls proc on each valid index of the specified subtext or substring, in increasing order, discarding the results of those calls. This is simply a safe and correct way to loop over a subtext or substring.

Example:

(let ((txt (string->text "abcde"))
      (v '()))
  (textual-for-each-index
   (lambda (cur) (set! v (cons (char->integer (text-ref txt cur)) v)))
   txt)
  v)(101 100 99 98 97)
[procedure] (textual-count textual pred [start end]) → integer

Returns a count of the number of characters in the specified subtext of textual that satisfy the given predicate.

[procedure] (textual-filter pred textual [start end]) → text
[procedure] (textual-remove pred textual [start end]) → text

Filter the given subtext of textual, retaining only those characters that satisfy / do not satisfy pred.

If textual is a string, then that string does not share any storage with the result, so subsequent mutation of that string will not affect the text returned by these procedures. If textual is a text, the result shares storage with that text whenever sharing would be space-efficient.

Replication & splitting

[procedure] (textual-replicate textual from to [start end]) → text

This is an "extended subtext" procedure that implements replicated copying of a subtext or substring.

textual is a text or string; start and end are optional arguments that specify a subtext of textual, defaulting to 0 and the length of textual. This subtext is conceptually replicated both up and down the index space, in both the positive and negative directions. For example, if textual is "abcdefg", start is 3, and end is 6, then we have the conceptual bidirectionally-infinite text

...  d  e  f  d  e  f  d  e  f  d  e  f  d  e  f  d  e  f  d ...
    -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1  0 +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9

textual-replicate returns the subtext of this text beginning at index from, and ending at to. It is an error if from is greater than to.

You can use textual-replicate to perform a variety of tasks:

Note that

It is an error if start = end, unless from = to, which is allowed as a special case.

[procedure] (textual-split textual delimiter [grammar limit start end]) → list

Returns a list of texts representing the words contained in the subtext of textual from start (inclusive) to end (exclusive). The delimiter is a text or string to be used as the word separator. This will often be a single character, but multiple characters are allowed for use cases such as splitting on "\r\n". The returned list will have one more item than the number of non-overlapping occurrences of the delimiter in the text. If delimiter is an empty text, then the returned list contains a list of texts, each of which contains a single character.

The grammar is a symbol with the same meaning as in the textual-join procedure. If it is infix, which is the default, processing is done as described above, except an empty textual produces the empty list; if grammar is strict-infix, then an empty textual signals an error. The values prefix and suffix cause a leading/trailing empty text in the result to be suppressed.

If limit is a non-negative exact integer, at most that many splits occur, and the remainder of textual is returned as the final element of the list (so the result will have at most limit+1 elements). If limit is not specified or is #f, then as many splits as possible are made. It is an error if limit is any other value.

To split on a regular expression re, use SRFI 115's regexp-split procedure:

(map string->text (regexp-split re (textual->string txt)))

About This Egg

Dependencies

The utf8 and r7rs eggs are required.

Maintainer

Wolfgang Corcoran-Mathe <wcm at sigwinch dot xyzzy without the zy>

Repository

GitHub

Version History

0.1 (2020-11-12)
Initial release.

License

Copyright (C) William D Clinger (2016). All Rights Reserved.

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

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